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Supersavers opticians frequently asked questions

1. How often should I have my eyes tested?
2. What is a glaucoma test and why is it important?
3. What is the anti- reflective coating?
4. Can I use photochromic lenses for driving?
5. Can I put my prescription lenses into sunglasses?
6. Why do I have to hold the newspaper further away from me to be able to focus on the print?
7. Can I buy contact lenses off the shelf?
8 What age do you have to be to start wearing contact lenses?
9. What is the procedure when getting contact lenses for the first time?

1. How often should I have my eyes tested?

Depending on age:
0-7 years: Every 3 – 12 months
7-18 years: Every 12 – 24 months
18-70years: At least every 24 months
These are guidelines only. Under certain circumstances the optometrist may recommend that you are seen more frequently than this.

2. What is a glaucoma test and why is it important?


There are a few variations of the glaucoma test. The purpose of all of them is to measure the pressure inside your eye. The most common glaucoma test is the "puff-of-air" test, technically known as the non-contact tonometer. For this test, the optician will start by having you put your chin on the machine's chin rest. While you look at a light inside the machine, the optician will line it up and puff a small burst of air at your open eye. It is completely painless, and the tonometer does not come in contact with the eye. Based on your eye's resistance to the puff of air, the machine calculates your intraocular pressure. The whole test takes just a few seconds. Since glaucoma is often the result of an increase of pressure inside the eye, it is a very important test for ensuring the long-term health of your eyes.

3. What is the anti- reflective coating?

Anti-reflective or antireflection (AR) coatings are a type of optical coating applied to the surface of lenses and other optical devices to reduce reflection. This improves the efficiency of the system since less light is lost. The coating on eyeglass lenses makes the eyes of the wearer more visible to others. Opticians dispense "antireflection lenses" because the decreased reflection makes them look better, and they produce less glare, which is particularly noticeable when driving at night or working in front of a computer monitor. The decreased glare means that wearers often find their eyes are less tired, particularly at the end of the day. Allowing more light to pass through the lens also increases contrast and therefore increases visual acuity.

4. Can I use photochromc lenses for driving?

Photochromic lenses are lenses that darken on exposure to UV radiation. Once the UV is removed (for example by walking indoors), the lenses will gradually return to their clear state. The windscreens of most modern cars are equipped with an UV blocking filter, therefore, photochromic lenses would not get completely dark inside the car.

5. Can I put my prescription lenses into sunglasses?

Yes, but not every frame is suitable for glazing with prescription lenses; also some shapes are not suitable for glazing with some prescriptions; See in store for details.

6. Why do I have to hold the newspaper further away from me to be able to focus on the print?

Usually around early to mid forties many people experience this problem, which is called ‘presbyopia’. The lens inside the eye which does the fine focusing for the eye becomes stiffer with age and looses its flexibility to focus. At this stage a reading prescription is required to help with the focus for near vision.

7. Can I buy contact lenses off the shelf?
Not unless You have a valid contact lens prescription. We are legally obliged to take a copy of your prescription when You want to purchase contact lenses.

8. What age do you have to be to start wearing contact lenses?

There is no age limit. However, if under the age of 16 we will fit contact lenses if there is a valid clinical reason and if there is parental permission and supervision.

9. What is the procedure when getting contact lenses for the first time?

A contact lens assesment involves 3 appointments: 1. the full sight test with a few extra measurements of your eyes (that's to determine the right size and shape of contact lenses); 2. contact lens teach: you will have to spend some time to learn how to put the lenses in and how to take them out, when succesful, you will be given some trial lenses for a few days; 3. after the trial period, you'll need a short check- up, to make sure the lenses are fitting well and that the vision with them is good.